ourse to rise higher than the Taj Mahal in the next year, becoming a fetid sy

mbol for what the United Nations considers one of the world’s most polluted capitals.

Hawks and other birds of prey hover around the towering Ghazipur landfill on the eastern

fringe of New Delhi, stray cows, dogs and rats wander at will over the huge expanse of smoking filth.

Taking up the area of more than 40 soccer pitches, Ghazipur

rises by nearly 10 meters a year with no end in sight to its foul-smelling growth.

According to East Delhi’s superintendent engineer Arun Kumar, it is already more than 65 meters high.

At its current rate of growth, it will be taller than the iconic Taj in Agra, about 73 meters high, in 2020.

India’s Supreme Court warned last year that red warning lights will soon have t

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